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Pompeii

Giancarlo Calicchia's granite stone sculpture "Gravitas" installed in front of the Cincinnati Museum Center.

"Gravitas"

Gravitas represents a state of being heavy with creation, thoughts, feeling and responsibilities. It is also the gravitation toward mental and physical awareness. Gravitas is experienced through wisdom, humility, empathy and accountability. The highest degree of humanity exists in the psyche of our folklore, as a reminder that our true purpose is to create. The sculpture "Gravitas" stands as a symbol and beacon to lead people into the Museum for the Pompeii exhibition.

A Day in Pompeii is a collection of more than 250 priceless ancient artifacts from the Roman city of Pompeii and its surrounding areas. In A.D. 79, Pompeii was frozen in time by the catastrophic eruption of Mt. Vesuvius, burying everything in its path for more than 1,700 years. The same ash and debris from Vesuvius’s unpredicted eruption that destroyed the city, is also the same thing that preserved it. A Day in Pompeii brings room-sized frescos, marble and bronze sculptures, jewelry, gold coins, and body casts of the volcano's victims to Cincinnati Museum Center’s 15,000-square-foot exhibition hall. Pompeii's archeological treasures rarely leave Italy, and this national touring exhibit marks the first time that these rare treasures will come to the region. Don't miss this moving glimpse through a unique window on the ancient past.

ABOUT THE EXHIBIT

The Roman city of Pompeii was frozen in time by the catastrophic eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 A.D. Pompeii's archeological treasures rarely leave Italy, and this national touring exhibit marks the first time that these rare treasures will come to the region. Room-sized frescos, marble and bronze sculptures, jewelry, gold coins, and hundreds of priceless ancient artifacts join body casts of the volcano's victims, eerily preserved in their final frantic moments. Don't miss this glimpse through a unique window into the ancient past.

CONTINUE YOUR EXPLORATION OF ANCIENT POMPEII!

Since 2005, University of Cincinnati Professor Steven Ellis has led an international team of archaeological researchers in excavations of Pompeii.

Click here to listen to Dr. Ellis's interview with WVXU's Jane Durrell.

Watch the video below to learn more about their research on the every-day life of the lower and middle classes of ancient Pompeii and their use of new technologies to document their findings!

Chris Cloke and Emily Egan from the University of Cincinnati’s Department of Classics has produced eight brilliant podcasts for A Day in Pompeii on subjects such as Roman Medicine, Gladiators and more! Click here to listen!

Don’t miss these A Day in Pompeii programs developed in partnership with the University of Cincinnati